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Didn’t sleep well last night because yesterday I drank coffee in the late afternoon and I should not have done it.  I know to sip caffeine late in the day makes me stay up.  I visited a friend in Vancouver.

Went to my volunteer cat care at Surrey SPCA.  So cute to see the cats.  Lots of kittens there: a redhead with white feet, two black kittens, black kitten1, black kitten2 with red fur and a small gray/black tabby.  One of the volunteer helpers said the gray/black kitten fell asleep in her hands and arms.

Hot today.  Phoenix in Vancouver for 4-5 days.

Someone stole my license plate with the tag last night or this morning. I’ve never had anyone steal my license plate ever until today. I already reported it to the police.  Why do people do that?  Sick society. It upsets me, but have had worse happen to my VW bus.

Yesterday morning before I departed for Vancouver I took still photos of a spider that lives outside our apartment.  The orange spider made me think of the Spider Woman.

All Indian people have creation stories about how the people evolved.  Dine’ known as Navajo has a creation story that  involves the Spider Woman. According to the book, Navajo Oral Tradition, Volume III when the story is told, it is recited during a certain time of the year.  If it is recited out of season, it is recited in a non-ceremonial condition.

The twins, sons of Changing Woman saw a hole in the ground with smoke coming out of it.  They looked inside and saw a woman, which was Spider Woman.  Weaving designs spread around her home. She gave them food too eat, corn mush. One of the boys ate the corn mush with two fingers, but a whisper in his ear, said to use only one finger because a crawler (snake) eats with two. At first one of the boys was hesitant to eat the corn mush.  The corn mush meal never emptied. It stayed full in the bowl.1

 She asked, “Where are you going?”

 They said, “To see our father.”

 She replied, “Who’s that?”

 “The Sun.”

 Spider woman warned them, “Travel in the day. Not at night.  Be careful of your father.” She gave them a life feather. They left the next day.2

 1.  Alfred W. Yazzie, Navajo Oral Tradition (Title VII Navajo Oral Tradition Project/Navajo Resource Center/Rough Rock Demonstration School, 1984), pp. 14-16.

 2. Alfred W. Yazzie, Navajo Oral Tradition (Title VII Navajo Oral Tradition Project/Navajo Resource Center/Rough Rock Demonstration School, 1984), pp. 14-16.

 

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